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2 edition of microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment found in the catalog.

microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment

Andrew Sydney Thompson

microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment

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Published by typescript in [s.l.] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Warwick, 1995.

Statementby Andrew Sydney Thompson.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19086112M


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microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment by Andrew Sydney Thompson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Microbial oxidation of sulfur - Wikipedia. The biogeochemical transformations related to methanesulfonic acid (MSA) formation and degradation are discussed, with reference to the role of marine bacteria and the phylogeny and biochemistry of methylotrophic bacteria are briefly reviewed.

The aims of the work presented were [i] to isolate novel MSA utilising bacteria. The microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment with reference to the role of marine bacteria and the phylogeny and biochemistry of methylotrophic bacteria are briefly reviewed.

The aims of the work presented were [i] to isolate novel MSA utilising bacteria Author: Andrew Sydney Thompson. The microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment.

Coronavirus: The microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment. Author: Andrew Sydney Thompson. The microbial oxidation of methanesulfonic acid in the marine environment. with reference to the role of marine\ud bacteria and the phylogeny and biochemistry of\ud methylotrophic bacteria are briefly reviewed.

The aims\ud of the work presented were [i] to isolate novel MSA\ud utilising bacteria Author: Andrew Sydney Thompson.

ATMOSPHERIC dimethyl sulphide, arising from marine algae, cyanobacteria and salt marsh plants such as Spartina, is the principal sulphur compound entering the atmosphere from terrestrial and aquatic environments Methanesulphonic acid (CH3SO3H; MSA) has been identified as a major product of the photochemical oxidation.

Thompson AS, Owens NJP, Murrell JC () Isolation and characterization of methanesulfonic acid degrading bacteria from the marine environment. Appl Env Microbiol – Google Scholar Uria-Nickelsen MR, Leadbetter ER, Codchaux W III () Sulfonate utilization by enteric bacteria. Abstract Methanesulfonic acid is a very stable strong acid and a key intermediate in the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur.

It is formed in megatonne quantities in the atmosphere from the chemical oxidation of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (most. Abstract Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a major source of sulfur to the marine boundary layer (MBL), and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is one of its two main final oxidation products.

MSA can participate in the. After both investigated substances were tentatively identified as halogenated methanesulfonic acids (HMSAs), the raw data was screened for the presence of additional HMSAs, namely chloromethanesulfonic acid (Cl-MSA, CH 2 ClSO 3 −, m/z ), bromomethanesulfonic acid (Br-MSA, CH 2 BrSO 3 −, m/z ), dibromomethanesulfonic acid.

Marine and Offshore Corrosion describes the principles of effective corrosion control treatments in marine environments, with emphasis on economic solutions to corrosion. The book explains chemical or electrochemical reaction of an alloy with its environment.

Methylosulfonomonas methylovoraM2 is an unusual gram-negative methylotrophic bacterium that can grow on methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Oxidation of MSA by this bacterium is carried out by a multicomponent MSA.

An interesting one-pot synthesis of saccharin-N-methane sulfonic acid from 2 is described affording (R = CH 2 SO 3 H) in good yield. A novel and practical method for the preparation saccharin derivatives from substituted toluene derivatives by oxidation.

Methane sulfonic acid (MSA) is an oxidation product of the reaction of OH radical with dimethyl sulfide and, hence, should be an important constituent of marine air. MSA concentrations in marine.

Two methylotrophic bacterial strains, TR3 and PSCH4, capable of growth on methanesulfonic acid as the sole carbon source were isolated from the marine environment. Methanesulfonic acid. Photooxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) in air in the presence of NO was studied.

Sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and methanesulfonic acid (CH 3 SO 3 H) are major sulfur‐containing products. In the reaction. Methanesulfonic acid (MSA), a strong acid that does not undergo photochemical oxidation, is produced by this oxidation and deposited on the earth's surface, where it can be biodegraded as.

Methanesulfonic acid (MSA), derived from the oxidation of dimethylsulfide (DMS), has a significant impact on biogenic sulfur cycle and climate. Gaseous MSA (MSAg) has been often ignored in. MSA (formula CH3SO3H, the smallest organic sulfonic acid) is one of the main products of DMS oxidation since it is estimated that 25–70% of the flux of dimethylsulfide is oxidized to.

Relative to the atmosphere, much of the aerobic ocean is supersaturated with methane; however, the source of this important greenhouse gas remains enigmatic. Catabolism of methylphosphonic acid by phosphorus-starved marine.

Marinosulfonomonas methylotropha strain TR3 is a marine methylotroph that uses methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as a sole carbon and energy source. The genes from M. methylotropha strain TR3 encoding methanesulfonate monooxygenase, the enzyme responsible for the initial oxidation. BibTeX @MISC{Thompson95isolationand, author = {A S Thompson and N Owens and J C Murrell and Andrew S.

Thompson and Nicholas J. Owens and J. Colin Murrell}, title = {Isolation and Characterization of Methanesulfonic Acid- Degrading Bacteria from the Marine Environment. Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a green acid with a remarkably high solubility for several speciality and base metals including lead, making it an interesting leaching agent for metals.

MSA is safer and less. Methanesulfonic acid (MsOH) or methanesulphonic acid (in British English) is a colorless liquid with the chemical formula CH 3 SO 3 H. It is the simplest of the alkylsulfonic acids.

Salts and esters of methanesulfonic acid. PROPERTIES. Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a strong, odorless, colorless to yellow liquid with the slight, sulphurous is soluble in water, slightly soluble in benzene, toluene, insoluble in paraffins.

Methanesulfonic acid is easy to handle and non-oxidizing. Incompatible with amines, bases, strong reducing agents, ethyl vinyl ether, hydrofluoric acid. The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of the atmospheric methane concentration (Conrad ), which significantly impacts global warming.

In marine sediments, the. Methane sulfonic acid (MSA) is an oxidation product of the reaction of OH radical with dimethyl sulfide and, hence, should be an important constituent of marine air.

MSA concentrations in marine aerosols. Microbial enzymes are also heavily used in food processing, both for preservation and to alter the texture, taste or quality of the food.

They are often used to tenderize meat, in baking, and to remove lactose from milk for those who are lactose intolerant. Marine. Marine microbial sulfur cycle.

Sulfate is quantitatively the most prominent anion in seawater. Since it can be used by a number of heterotrophic bacteria as an electron acceptor in respiration following the depletion of dissolved oxygen, the resulting sulfate reduction and the further recycling of the reduced sulfur compounds make the marine environment.

However, microbial role of sulfur oxidation under these habitats especially marine sediments is largely unknown, with exception of certain mat-formin g and fi lamentous bacteria (Jørgensen ). Microbial oxidation of sulfur is the oxidation of sulfur by microorganisms to produce energy.

The oxidation of inorganic compounds is the strategy primarily used by chemolithotrophic microorganisms. Thompson AS, Owens N, Murrell JC. Isolation and characterization of methanesulfonic Acid-degrading bacteria from the marine environment. Appl Environ Microbiol.

Jun; 61 (6)– [Europe PMC free article] [Google Scholar] Uria-Nickelsen MR, Leadbetter ER, Godchaux W., 3rd Sulphonate utilization by enteric bacteria.

Oxidation states of Sulfur. Sulphur, a reactive element with stable valence states from -2 to +6 is among the most abundant elements in the earth crust. It has four main oxidation states in nature, which are -2, +2, +4, and +6.

The common sulfur species of each oxidation. A radiotracer method which measures rates of oxidation of methane to cell material, extracellular products, and carbon dioxide has been applied to two lakes and indicates that methane oxidation.

Microbial metal-sulfide oxidation in inactive hydrothermal vent chimneys suggested by metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses Dimitri V.

Meier,1†* Petra Pjevac,1† Wolfgang Bach,2 Stephanie Markert, 3Thomas Schweder, John Jamieson,4 Sven Petersen,5 Rudolf Amann1 and Anke Meyerdierks1* 1Max Planck Institute for Marine. In marine sediments, which typically contain relatively high manganese levels, N 2 gas can be produced by the oxidation of ammonia and organic N by manganese dioxide in air or linked in series to anoxic organic matter oxidation.

Petroleum pollution has become a serious environmental problem, which can cause harmful damage to the environment and human health. This pollutant is introduced into the environment. erable effort has been devoted to the oxidation and oxidative carbonylation of methane [2].

By contrast, the sulfonation of methane has not received as much attention despite its commercial importance [3]. The current commercial process for the synthesis of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) occurs via the chlorine oxidation.

(A) Proposed ionic reaction mechanism for the C–H activation of CH4 in the selective production of MSA (Methanesulfonic acid). (B) Advantages of the cationic pathway over the radical. A large amount of marine sediment was launched on land by the Great East Japan earthquake.

Here, we employed both on-site and laboratory studies on the launched marine sediment to investigate the succession of microbial communities and its effects on geochemical properties of the sediment.

Twenty-two-month on-site survey showed that microbial. [5] In the remote marine environment, MSA is produced via the oxidation of DMS [Davis et al., ].

Once in the atmosphere, DMS is oxidized by OH via a branched mechanism to produce either SO 2. Resting cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast, type II; Sigma) were used to convert oleic acid into hydroxyoctadecanoic acid with a 45% yield. Nocardia aurantia (ATCC ), Nocardia sp. (NRRL ), and Mycobacterium fortuitum (UI ) all converted oleic acid into oxo-octadecanoic acid .A progressive increase in the environmental range, arranged in a series, follows: rain water, mine water, peat bogs, sea water, rivers and lakes, marine sediments, and evaporites, while the geothermal environment shows the maximal area.

The potential milieu of the green bacteria .